cleve archers supporting archery in south gloucestershire and bristol

Scoring

What is a ‘round’?

A round is a set number of arrows at each distance on a certain face size with a particular type of scoring.  With some rounds having up to 4 distances it would get really confusing to try and convey all of this information each time you shoot so we give the combination of all this information an easy to remember name.  These are often named after the place where they originated for UK rounds or the distance/maximum number of points for World Archery Rounds.

How do I score?

The basic idea is simply to record the value of each arrow as you shoot and then total up how many points you got for the whole round.

There are a few extra rules that you need to follow if you want to submit your score for club records or for your personal handicap:

1) The round must be shot starting with the longest distance.

2) For imperial rounds you cannot practice beforehand. You are only allowed 6 arrows as ‘sighters’ at the longest distance before you shoot.

3) For World Archery Rounds you are allowed to practice for up to 45 minutes before shooting (if you want to replicate tournament conditions about 3 ends of as many arrows as you like is normal at competitions).

How do I score?

What type of scoring you use will depend on which round you are shooting.  Outdoors the Imperial rounds are scored by colour zones 9, 7, 5, 3, 1 and the Metric Rounds are scored on each ring  x, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  For either method of scoring if you miss the target you should record an M.

What should I do when I’ve shot and scored the round?

Once you have completed your round you should submit you should enter your score online, if you have not received a username and password please contact us.

Do I have to shoot rounds and submit scores?

Not if you don’t want to, it’s not a requirement. However, shooting scored rounds is a really good way to track your progress as you improve. You will move up through the classifications and get lower handicaps as you get better.

You will also be able to participate in any handicapped tournaments that the club runs, this includes the club end of season shoot. The handicap system is designed to ‘level the playing field’, so beginners can compete on equal terms with experienced archers even if they are shooting a different bowstyle.